Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Fortunate Fool

Monday, May 18th, 2009

Yep, that’s me.

I’m setting my pots and pans aside to share some thoughts of mine.

A wild ride that began in early 2003 has ended victoriously with a Master’s Degree for my husband.

Or in other words a M.S.E. ES S-I-P-P-I!  A Master’s in Software Engineering!

True dedication got him to where he is today. Nothing was given to him freely or easily and I admire his persistence and success. I am continually amazed by his non-stop go get it mind-set and ideas.

drawk, I know you are going far. I can’t wait to see where you go from here…I can only imagine.

There is so much to learn from you and thank you for all you have given me.

I’m not the best at getting sentimental in words, so here is a song that describes pretty much how I’m feeling.

It’s a good listen anyhow…

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BLR4g33W6R8[/youtube]

CONGRATULATIONS!

Slow Cooker Chicken Curry

Wednesday, April 22nd, 2009

In all of  my 32 years, I have never prepared anything with curry in it.

And amazingly, among the various unused spice bottles, there was no curry in sight either.

This very simple Slow Cooker Chicken Curry recipe that will follow was the whole reason I have now added curry to the collection…of unused spice bottles.

Only five simple and mostly on hand ingredients are required.

I had A LOT of chicken. I used two packages of boneless, skinless chicken thighs (16), Ortega Thick and Chunky Salsa and a brown onion.

Slow Cooker Curry Chicken recipe was adapted from kraftfoods.com

  • Slow Cooker Chicken Curry
    • 16 skinless chicken thighs
    • 1 Jar (16 oz.) Thick and Chunky Salsa
    • 1 medium onion, chopped
    • 2 Tbsp. curry powder
    • 1 C. fat free sour cream
    • Place chicken in slow cooker.
    • In a bowl combine salsa, onions and curry powder; pour over chicken.
    • Cover with lid.
    • Cook on LOW for 8-10 hours or on HIGH for 5 hours.
    • Remove chicken to a serving platter; cover to keep warm, if needed.
    • Add sour cream to slow cooker; stir until well blended.
    • Serve over the chicken.

In the end, the chicken is so moist and ready to be eaten, but the sour cream sauce is an interesting addition.

The plan was to have a bunch of artfully placed chicken thighs on a platter. So with a master plan in mind and with tongs in hand, I went for the chicken. The more I tried to become one with the chicken, the more it hesitated, hence the splatters and fallen apart, moist chicken.

Here’s the huge pile of Slow Cooker Curry Chicken without sauce.

I served this with white rice which left plenty of room for imagination with sauce usage.

My husband put his chicken on his pile of rice and poured the sauce over both. I poured sauce over my chicken and enjoyed my rice mostly plain. My son wanted no part in the sauce.

Here’s an embarrassing little picture of my plate…

Okay, so now I’m going to break it down.

If you love the taste of curry powder, you’ll love this Slow Cooker Curry Chicken. I am undecided on the matter.

I now know 2 Tablespoons of curry powder was too large of an amount to introduce curry in.

I am a curry newbie. I’m discovering there are so many more kinds of curry than just curry powder. It’s quite amazing.

Some time I will be up for trying some real curry, but not for awhile though. I need a curry break.

Potato Love

Sunday, November 30th, 2008

So, I found a cool heart-shaped potato today while washing potatoes for a batch of tasty Creamy Mashed Potatoes. Behold, the heart-shaped potato I found…

Heart-shaped potato

Besides just being tasty, potatoes contain other neat properties.

Potatoes have no fat, are sodium free and high in potassium and vitamin C.

Eating potatoes with skins on make them an excellent choice for fiber as well.

Plus, the natural carbohydrate that potatoes provide are used more efficiently by the body than processed or refined carbohydrates.

Fresh potatoes are typically the ideal natural size of 6 ounces, containing just 100 calories.

Potatoes are naturally packed with potassium and are much healthier, potassium-wise than some of the other healthies.

Potassium, which is essential for normal function of muscles including the heart, maintaining the body’s electrolyte balance and it also plays an important roll in maintaining the body’s water balance. Low potassium intake may be a significant factor in the development of high blood pressure.

April 25: National Zucchini Bread Day

Friday, April 25th, 2008

Did you know there is a National Day for Zucchini Bread? It’s true…and that day is today.

Which got me thinking about my son’s recent requests for some breads or muffins using orange juice. He told me you can substitute orange juice for the water or milk in any bread/muffin recipe. I asked how he found this out and he said he learned it from the reading portion of his AIMS test, our state’s standardized test. Ha! I know he seeks and retains a lot of info, but how funny is that? Pretty cool too, seeing as how reading comprehension was my least favorite thing to test on when I was in school, even though I loved to read.

How can you deny your loved ones asking for a slightly healthier alternative?! You can’t. And I won’t. Let’s have a go at this Zucchini Bread made with orange juice and applesauce…

  • Awesome Zucchini Bread
    • 2 C sugar
    • 1 cup vegetable oil
    • 3 eggs
    • 2 tsp. vanilla
    • 2 C shredded zucchini
    • 1/2 C applesauce
    • 1/3 C orange juice
    • 3 C flour
    • 2 tsp. baking soda
    • 1/2 tsp. baking powder
    • 1 tsp. salt
    • 1-3/4 tsp. nutmeg
    • 1-1/2 tsp. cinnamon
    • 1 C chopped walnuts
    • Preheat oven to 350°
    • In large bowl mix sugar, oil, eggs and vanilla. Beat until well blended.
    • Add zucchini, applesauce and orange juice; stir well.
    • In another bowl, combine flour with dry ingredients; baking soda, baking powder, salt, nutmeg and cinnamon.
    • Add flour mixture to zucchini mixture; stir well.
    • Add nuts; stir gently to combine.
    • Pour into 2 greased and floured 9″ loaf pans.
    • Bake for 60-70 minutes; until toothpick comes out clean.
    • Let cool in pans for 10 minutes. Remove from pans onto wire rack and cool completely.
    • Makes 2 loaves

I made a slight change to the recipe and used 1 cup wheat flour and 2 cups white flour.

To ensure even cooking, half way through the cooking time I moved the left pan to the right side of the oven and vice versa. This is always a good idea when baking 2 pans of anything.

The bread browned very early on in the cooking process, but it was a dark colored batter to begin with. I admit I was a little worried. Then when the zucchini bread was done baking my husband said, “That’s the best smelling bread I’ve ever smelled…it smells like *sniff sniff* pizza and pancakes at the same time.” Maybe the oddest kitchen compliment I’ve ever received.

Either way, my conclusion is that this recipe makes a really awesome, moist zucchini bread that will not disappoint.

February: National Heart Month

Saturday, February 23rd, 2008

Oh, yes. There’s more to February than an abundance of chocolate. It is also National Heart Month, so here are several things we can do that may protect our hearts.

walnut-300.jpg

Get nutty! “Scientific evidence suggests but does not prove that eating 1.5 ounces per day of most nuts, as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol, may reduce the risk of heart disease.” This chart has a really clear break down of the nutrients in one ounce of tree nuts and peanuts. So eat a handful of nuts today!

vegetableart01.jpg Color your meals healthy. Eating lots of colorful fruits and vegetables is good for your overall health and may help protect against heart disease. Personally, I think that laughing at colorful fruits and vegetables may help too. Have a look for yourself.

bread.jpg Go with whole grains. “Diets rich in whole-grain foods and other plant foods and low in total fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol, may help reduce the risk of heart disease and certain cancers.” Make sure to eat foods with 51 percent or more whole grain ingredients. (such as wheat or oats)


DriedBeans.jpg Jump on the bean bandwagon. Which bean is your thing? There’s garbanzo beans, black beans, red beans, navy beans, pinto beans…should I go on? All these beans and more provide soluble fiber and insoluble fiber. As part of a low-saturated fat, low-cholesterol diet, they may be helpful for your heart. They’re also a great source of folate, another nutrient that may help your heart.

So in honor of National Heart Month, skip that piece of white bread and have wheat. Eats plenty of fruits and vegetables. At snacktime have a handful of nuts and of course, don’t forget to eat plenty of beans.



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